Abstract

Effects of Self-Regulation Strategies Training on Secondary Students’ Attitude and Self-Reflection Toward Mathematics

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine whether practicing self-regulation strategies involved setting goals, self-evaluation and self-correction on formative tests improved students’ positive attitudes toward learning mathematics. The students’ attitudes toward mathematics were measured of the factors in their perceived confidence, motivation, usefulness of the subject, and perception about teacher’s attitude toward their learning. The study also aimed at exploring self-regulation characteristics of different performing groups of mathematics achievement so that appropriate instructional design can be introduced and imposed within the mathematics classroom. The study utilized a one-group pretest-posttest design for exploratory purposes. The self-regulation strategies were introduced to 46 tenth-grade secondary students. Their perceived motivation, confidence, anxiety, usefulness of the subject, and perception about teacher’s attitude were measured as the pretest measures before they were trained with setting goals, self-evaluation, and self-correction strategy training. These measures of the factors were compared at the end of the academic year. The study found that students’ perceived confidence, motivation, usefulness of the subject, and perception about teacher’s attitude toward student learning were significantly different after they underwent the training. The high-performing group of students was more confident, motivated, less anxious, and highly engaged in self-reflection as compared to their counterparts, low-performing group of students. In addition, students’ confidence, motivation, anxiety, and engagement in self-reflection were found significantly correlated with mathematics performance.

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