All posts by: technovision

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Beliefs towards Mathematics in Elementary Education Teachers: a comparative study

Abstract: This work is part of a broader investigation developed in Ibero-America, whose main objective is to carry out an analysis of the affective domain towards mathematics in elementary education teachers, and how that could affect the teaching practices. In particular, this work focusses on the beliefs towards mathematics and shows the comparison between teachers of two countries: Spain and Colombia. The methodology consisted on a quantitative approach at a descriptive level, using a convenience sample composed of 235 teachers (105 from Spain and 130 from Colombia); the instrument was translated to Spanish from the scale of Beliefs of Baroody and Coslick (1998); the statistical analysis was performed with SPSS v 22. The results showed in both countries a majority of teachers who manifested Euclidean beliefs, without differences by country. On the other hand, there were significant differences in the Quasiempirist category, with more Colombian than Spanish teachers lying on; in the importance provided to the context in the teaching of Mathematics, and in the conception of the mathematical skill as inherent. The limitations of the study are exposed and several suggestions to deepen the study in the future are made.

Download: JRSMTE #V1-3-7_Fernandez-Cezar
Download: 20, size: 728.0 KB, date: 14.Sep.2018
Issue - 3

Physics classroom interactions: Teaching strategies and practices

Abstract: This study investigated the interactions that occurred as part of the learning from a national survey of high school physics teachers in New Zealand (NZ) in relation to decile ranking.  Specifically, the study investigated how often particular teaching strategies and practices such as: teaching approaches, teacher feedback and guidance, and ICT usage, occurred during physics teaching. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistical and inferential statistics – MANOVA. Among other things, the study revealed that learners were not exposed to the teaching methods that potentially give them the chance to observe, engage and/or discover expert strategies in context. There was a lack of use of problem-based or inquiry learning models for learning. However, there was no significant difference between teaching in the various decile rankings.  The implications of the findings are discussed.

Download: JRSMTE #V1-3-6_BUABENG
Download: 26, size: 508.2 KB, date: 08.Sep.2018
Issue - 3

Development of an Integrative Learning Unit to Enhance Students’ Conceptual Understanding of Dissolution and Their Reasoning Sophistication

Abstract: Chemistry education requires establishing connections between chemistry concepts and learners’ experiences encountered in the real world. However, due to the abstract nature of chemistry which is regularly displayed in an isolated-fashion in classrooms, this results in the difficulty when learners utilize knowledge relationally and rationally. To ease this learning issue, a conceptually integrative learning unit incorporating chemical concepts of dissolution was developed, involving polarity, concentration, and chemical structure. The purposes of this study are three-fold. The first is to cognitively embrace students in the content in terms of factual and applied knowledge. The second is placed on the reasoning sophistication, which plays a crucial role in problem solving, decision making, and data interpretation, by classifying it into three levels: Intuition, hybrid, and analytics.   The third is to explore cognitive authority reflecting forms of knowledge which students lean towards when making decision: Direct experiences (first-hand knowledge) and learning from other people (second-hand knowledge). This research study was conducted in a quantitative manner based on a pretest-posttest design with 79 upper secondary students. The results showed that there was a statistically significant increase in students’ conceptual understanding in both factual and applied knowledge, after participating in the developed learning unit. In addition, over 20% of the students exhibited more sophisticated reasoning skills (i.e. hybrid or analytic level of reasoning). Furthermore, forms of cognitive authority underpinning the reasoning skills shifted from second-hand knowledge towards first-hand knowledge after participating in the learning unit, which is considered as a more scientifically appropriate form of knowledge.

Download: JRSMTE #V1-3-3_YASRI_PUB
Download: 34, size: 784.7 KB, date: 17.Aug.2018
Issue - 3

Mobile Communication as a Platform for Learning Science from Peers: Possibilities in Bangladesh

Abstract: Wireless and mobile technologies have become an inseparable part in our daily life and we are being depended on their related services which have added new dimensions in our way of thinking. Numerous applications for mobile technologies make m-learning flexible and convenience to the learner and now it becomes easy to interact and communicate for the learners. This study offers to analyze the possibilities of creating 9 and 10 graders’ learning communities through mobile communication which would also emphasize to promote free tutoring. The concepts of Mobile learning and positive peer influence are the main analytical tools to answer the research questions. This study followed a qualitative approach to emphasize on young students’ voice regarding the effect and possibilities of using mobile in understanding science and anchored within Social constructivism theory. Fifteen students from seven different schools of Dhaka city and parents were selected using convenience sampling technique to conduct interview and focus group discussion respectively. Three educationists from different mobile and software companies were chosen purposively to conduct semi-structured interviews. The study revealed peer support as an important aspect in understanding science contents. The effectiveness of mobile communication among peers in learning science contents has discovered in a way that it not only helps both students and parents in getting more time from daily routine but also bears the potentiality in reducing extra unwanted monthly expenses. The complex relation in terms of Youth-Technology-Culture revealed as an important aspect to be addressed and considered while introducing and implementing the interventions of m-learning for 9 and 10 graders.

Download: JRSMTE #V1-3-2_MIM_PUB
Download: 24, size: 668.9 KB, date: 17.Aug.2018
Issue - 3

The Impact of Teacher Technology Training on Student Technology Assessments

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the connections that may exist between the student technology literacy performance in the national schools and teachers who have had technology-focused professional development. Utilizing the online NAEP data, the study examined two school-reported variables related to teacher technology-specific professional development and student TEL scores on a national level. The results presented here suggest that teachers with training in technology usage may be more successful with students than those without. This study may provide insight into understanding more about the relevance of teacher training with regards to technology.

Download: JRSMTE #V1-3-1_ZHANG_PUB
Download: 57, size: 682.8 KB, date: 17.Aug.2018
Issue - 3

Chemistry Games in the Classroom: A Pilot Study

Abstract: In this study a game-based learning approach was introduced among students and teachers. Several chemistry games and a survey method were used as a tool to obtain insight into students’ knowledge about ionic bonding, to learn about the students’ and teachers’ perceptions related to this teaching method and to get insights into the misunderstanding and misconceptions that students might have. Students were tested on the ionic bonding test and both students and teachers anonymously filled in a questionnaire to express their perceptions about the game-based learning approach. Students achievements on the test were satisfactory; the mean score was 11.31 out of 15 (or 75.33 %). Most comments regarding the lesson itself were positive, stating that the lesson was well planned, interesting and very helpful. The usage of games in chemistry classroom was proven to be an excellent way to motivate students, to provide active engagement and discussion among students and to develop skills to solve problems.

Download: JRSMTE #V1-2-1_STOJANOVSKA_PUB
Download: 55, size: 931.8 KB, date: 04.Jul.2018
Issue - 2

Effects of Self-Regulation Strategies Training on Secondary Students’ Attitude and Self-Reflection Toward Mathematics

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine whether practicing self-regulation strategies involved setting goals, self-evaluation and self-correction on formative tests improved students’ positive attitudes toward learning mathematics. The students’ attitudes toward mathematics were measured of the factors in their perceived confidence, motivation, usefulness of the subject, and perception about teacher’s attitude toward their learning. The study also aimed at exploring self-regulation characteristics of different performing groups of mathematics achievement so that appropriate instructional design can be introduced and imposed within the mathematics classroom. The study utilized a one-group pretest-posttest design for exploratory purposes. The self-regulation strategies were introduced to 46 tenth-grade secondary students. Their perceived motivation, confidence, anxiety, usefulness of the subject, and perception about teacher’s attitude were measured as the pretest measures before they were trained with setting goals, self-evaluation, and self-correction strategy training. These measures of the factors were compared at the end of the academic year. The study found that students’ perceived confidence, motivation, usefulness of the subject, and perception about teacher’s attitude toward student learning were significantly different after they underwent the training. The high-performing group of students was more confident, motivated, less anxious, and highly engaged in self-reflection as compared to their counterparts, low-performing group of students. In addition, students’ confidence, motivation, anxiety, and engagement in self-reflection were found significantly correlated with mathematics performance.

Download: JRSMTE #V1-2-2_TEE_PUB
Download: 59, size: 769.1 KB, date: 04.Jul.2018
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Year Five Pupils’ Understanding of Relationship Between Addition and Subtraction

Abstract: Conceptual understanding of properties of operations is an important element of algebraic thinking in primary school. Mathematical processes should be focused rather than mathematical products starting from primary school. The purpose of this study was to examine the Year Five pupils’ understanding of relationship between addition and subtraction. Researchers utilized quantitative approach to investigate Year Five pupils’ conceptual understanding of addition and subtraction. Pencil and paper-based assessment consisting of three items was employed to collect the data. The three items comprised direction of change and relationship between addition and subtraction items. The three items also consist of reasoning sections. This article reports the analysis of the responses of 720 Year Five pupils from a district of Malacca. The findings showed the majority of the sample were unable to perform well for the items testing relationship between addition and subtraction. They could not work with addition and subtraction properties. The majority of them were also unable to provide conceptual reasoning for their answer. Only about half of the sample were aware about the inverse relationship of addition and subtraction.

Download: JRSMTE #V1-2-3_SOMASUNDRAM_PUB
Download: 34, size: 493.8 KB, date: 04.Jul.2018
Issue - 2

Computational Thinking Initiation. An experience with robots in Primary Education

Abstract: Computational Thinking (CT) is an increasingly interesting educational trend, since it is currently thought that the next generation will need to master this skill in order to succeed in modern life. At the same time, research indicates that motivation is a key element that affects the effectiveness of educational processes. Consequently, educators should take into account this fact when designing teaching sequences. In this paper, we present a robotics-based instruction for third-grade students aimed at introducing computational thinking ideas. The experience was carried out with 63 students. An assessment of different indicators concerning learning outcomes, such as mental rotation or computation thinking gains, was performed. In particular, from a motivational perspective, a test developed by Keller (1983; 1987; 2010) was employed in order to assess four dimensions: attention, relevance, confidence and satisfaction. Results show the participants’ high motivation after working with robot computational ideas. These results may eventually support the use of educational robotics in order to promote students’ development of computational thinking in primary schools.

Download: JRSMTE #V1-2-4_MERINO-ARMERO_PUB.docx
Download: 60, size: 740.9 KB, date: 04.Jul.2018
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The Correlation of Perceptions of Professional Roles and Teacher Beliefs with the Quality of Teacher Interaction

Abstract: The literature and research results suggest that teachers’ behavior in the classroom is under the strong influence of teachers’ beliefs about their own role in the educational process. The aim of this study was to examine the perception of teacher’s professional roles and teacher’s beliefs about teaching, and their correlation with the quality of teacher interaction. The study was conducted on a sample of 99 primary school teachers. The perception of the role of teachers and pupils was examined by the metaphor technique, and the Approaches to Teaching Inventory and Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction were applied. The results show that teacher beliefs differ depending on the research approach. The qualitative approach shows a dominant protective – traditional orientation in understanding the role of a teacher, and a typical traditional orientation in understanding the role of pupils, while the quantitative approach based on teacher self-assessments points to the dominance of the constructivist approach focused on the pupil. There was also a weak correlation between teacher beliefs and teacher interpersonal behavior, which is considered in the context of data collection technique, teacher self-assessments.

Download: JRSMTE #V1-2-5_SASIC_PUB
Download: 24, size: 938.6 KB, date: 04.Jul.2018
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